Space for Ace Courtesans & the Tom Hiddleston Appreciation Hour

Sexuality Sexual Identity

Though the idea of being an asexual sex worker seems contradictory, in this episode Signora Justina di Silvestri and I explore what it means to be a woman who embraces this persona. We discuss patrons, gender identity, sexuality, consent and more. Then we ask the really important questions: What kind of garb should Tom Hiddleston wear? Would you have sex with him? 😉

Show Notes

If you’d like to learn more about asexuality and other sexual identities that fall under the ace umbrella, please visit the Asexual Visibility and Education Network.

Still curious? Here’s an article about what it’s like to be an asexual sex worker. This article is written by Kitty Stryker, notable activist and writer on consent culture, sex work, and feminism.

Thonoit Arbeau’s Orchesography: 16th c French dances translated into English, modern French, and German. The music for the dances is available to download or purchase, or you can stream it from Spotify. I post dance instructions, example videos, and practice playlists on my site if you’re interested in delving deeper. <3

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Episode Credits

Sound Engineering: Evan Meier

  • Intro Music: The King of Denmark’s Galliard, written by John Dowland and published in 1604 in Lachrimæ, or Seaven Teares. Performed by I Solipsisti. Provided by MusOpen. Sounds provided by ZapSplat and AmbientMixer.
  • Celebrity Objectification Challenge: , written by John Dowland and published in 1604 in Lachrimæ, or Seaven Teares. Performed by I Solipsisti. Provided by MusOpen.
  • Life Hacks for Courtiers: Mr. John Langton’s Pavan, written by John Dowland and published in 1604 in Lachrimæ, or Seaven Teares. Performed by I Solipsisti. Provided by MusOpen. Mr. George Whitehead his Almand, written by John Dowland and published in 1604 in Lachrimæ, or Seaven Teares. Performed by I Solipsisti. Provided by MusOpen.

Edited with Audacity.

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